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Author Topic: Watcha readin?  (Read 8585 times)

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momitsnowme

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Re: Watcha readin?
« Reply #75 on: August 07, 2018, 04:58:00 PM »
I've recently finished
We Are Okay
Sorcery for Beginners
Midnight at the Electric

Right now I'm reading
On Homesickness, which is really fantastic and
Unbecoming. It's pretty good but I'm kind of over it.

kid.

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Re: Watcha readin?
« Reply #76 on: September 04, 2018, 07:40:00 PM »
Witch-hunt: Mysteries of The Salem Witch Trials

Prisoners of Geography
It examines Russia, China, the US, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Japan, Korea, and Greenland and the Arctic—their weather, seas, mountains, rivers, deserts, and borders—to provide a context often missing from our political reportage: how the physical characteristics of these countries affect their strengths and vulnerabilities and the decisions made by their leaders.It explains the complex geo-political strategies that shape the globe.

momitsnowme

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Re: Watcha readin?
« Reply #77 on: September 06, 2018, 07:36:49 PM »
That sounds really interesting! I took a class in college on how geography shaped the spread of Buddhism across Southeast Asia and it was really great

thetrashisright

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Re: Watcha readin?
« Reply #78 on: September 10, 2018, 09:10:33 AM »
Witch-hunt: Mysteries of The Salem Witch Trials

Prisoners of Geography
It examines Russia, China, the US, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Japan, Korea, and Greenland and the Arctic—their weather, seas, mountains, rivers, deserts, and borders—to provide a context often missing from our political reportage: how the physical characteristics of these countries affect their strengths and vulnerabilities and the decisions made by their leaders.It explains the complex geo-political strategies that shape the globe.

You may also be interested in James C Scott's The Art of Not Being Governed, where he discusses geographic scenarios that have allowed for avoidance/resistance to the state.

thetrashisright

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Re: Watcha readin?
« Reply #79 on: November 28, 2018, 03:33:51 PM »
Witch-hunt: Mysteries of The Salem Witch Trials

Prisoners of Geography
It examines Russia, China, the US, Latin America, the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Japan, Korea, and Greenland and the Arctic—their weather, seas, mountains, rivers, deserts, and borders—to provide a context often missing from our political reportage: how the physical characteristics of these countries affect their strengths and vulnerabilities and the decisions made by their leaders.It explains the complex geo-political strategies that shape the globe.

You may also be interested in James C Scott's The Art of Not Being Governed, where he discusses geographic scenarios that have allowed for avoidance/resistance to the state.

It's a great book. I love all of James C Scotts books I have read. I send them out through the prison book program I help run as much as I can/they come in. I honestly don't especially trust white anthropologists but he does a pretty decent job.

I am trying to read the Golden Gulag because I love Critical Resistance/Ruthie Gilmores input in the world but it's muuuch more of a slog through her sociogeographic mind (as brilliant as it is). I just read The End of Policing which isn't really written for me, and that's a good thing - I am immersed in that world so I already knew a lot of what he was saying but it's a GREAT way to make police abolition accessible to people who may be new to the idea. Same thing with As Black As Resistance - not really for me since I've read This Nonviolence Stuff and We Will Shoot Back but it's an excellent way to get people on board with the ideas.

momitsnowme

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Re: Watcha readin?
« Reply #80 on: December 08, 2018, 07:36:42 AM »
The Nix by Nathan Alan. It's sooo good.

rory

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Re: Watcha readin?
« Reply #81 on: December 09, 2018, 05:46:32 PM »
Gilles Deleuze: Essential Guides for Literary Studies by Claire Colebrook

and I just ordered and therefore will be starting soon:
Fatal Deception: The Terrifying True Story of How Asbestos Is Killing America by Michael Bowker

I just had to remove asbestos from my new house, so I'm excited to get pissed and terrified about it.
Quote from: Winged Killick
I'm an anarchist, but I'm not going to drive ninety-five miles an hour down the road tossing illegal, invasive species of snakes from my car while texting and fraudulently doing my taxes.

thetrashisright

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Re: Watcha readin?
« Reply #82 on: March 02, 2019, 09:10:40 PM »
because i am hopelessly lonely and feel more feelings to this dead board than anything else online i will post here

this has been a bangup year for me reading. it's been hard for me to concentrate but i've been determined to finish some books and learn to not fixate on the internet, as much at least. i finished The Three-Body Problem, a Chinese sci fi novel set through the Cultural Revolution up to now. The summary I got when I asked what it was about was "science stops working," which I think tells you very little in reality but is also accurate.

As Black As Resistance was a great primer read. I had already thought/read a lot about what it wrote about but I would absolutely recommend it to more liberal types (not meaning to knock) who may want some outside perspectives.

Finally finished The Dispossessed after fits and starts of reading it for many years. I wish it was a little more sci/spec fic than it actually was but still, I can see how it was such a revolutionary book.

James C. Scott's Against The Grain is really hard to get through. He's an anarchist anthropologist who basically makes me feel like everything is hopeless and it's all been bad for so long. This isn't his point, it's often to point out the opposite, sites of resistance and how 'modern civilization' can manifest differently. But it can be hard to stomach all the bad over such a long period of time, it gets overwhelming. Very, very informative though.

The Vegetarian by Han Kang was really interesting and resonated a lot with me. A decade and a half of veganism and engagement with ecology made me feel a lot of what the primary protagonist/subject of the book goes through and have felt the same impulses and desires. It's not a political or polemnical book to be clear, just a novel that doesn't really touch much on the ins and outs of vegetarianism.